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In the Heart of Africa

The Tanganiki Sausage Factory, 1914

The Great War, In the Heart of Africa, 28mm Our first game of 2012 was based around an exchange in Black Adder Goes Forth. When Capt. Blackadder asked half-wit Lt. George why the war began, George blamed “the vile Hun and his villainous empire building”. Blackadder replied; “George, the British Empire at present covers a

The Lost City of Zimpoopoo, 1890

Misc., Darkest Africa, In the Heart of Africa, 28mm Regular readers of this website will know by now that my wargaming friend Colin Jack rarely puts on sensible games. While others field Seven Years War Prussians or Napoleonic French, Colin delights in the obscure, the colourful and the downright ridiculous. This week’s game was no

The Umbongu Bend, 1890

Misc., Darkest Africa, In the Heart of Africa, 28mm I’ve said it before – you can’t expect a sensible game with a set of Chris Peers’ rules, but you can be sure it’ll be fun. This rare foray into “Darkest Africa was no exception. A Belgian expedition (led by Bill Gilchrist) had to cross the

Fort Nakedai, 1892

Misc., Darkest Africa, In the Heart of Africa, 28mm Anyone who reads this journal will know by now that Chris Peers’ rules produce fun, silly games. One of the strangest of his rule sets is In the Heart of Africa. It works a little like Contemptible Little Armies / Back of Beyond, only there’s a lot

Randipandi, 1857

The Indian Mutiny, In the Heart of Africa modified, 28mm This was a period we hadn’t played for a long time,  so Colin Jack and I decided to run an Indian Mutiny game. For some reason we didn’t have a suitably dusty table covering, so we made do with a game set in the monsoon

Pangani Ridge, 1914

The Great War, In the Heart of Africa (modified), 28mm We hadn’t played with our East African toys for a while, so we decided to bring them all out and have a game. Well, not quite all of them – the He He, the Masai and the Ngoni stayed at home, and it was left to

Fight for the Stone Bridge, 1890

Misc., Darkest Africa, In the Heart of Africa, 28mm We decided that it was time to give our Darkest Africa toys an outing again. The original idea was for a ridiculously complicated multi-player game, but in the end we opted for a simple two sided scrap. this involved a border clash between a small force

Surat Bay, 1700

Misc., Pirates, In the Heart of Africa modified, 28mm Every so often we run a ridiculously big all-day multip-player, usually in the breakfast room of Hugh Wilson’s guesthouse in Edinburgh. It was out of season, so we could indulge ourselves.  This time we brought out our pirates, but instead of setting it in the Caribbean, we opted

Pandibash, 1857

The Indian Mutiny, In the Heart of Africa modified, 28mm Well, after weeks of painting my Indian Mutineers were finally able to take the field. We set up a large 8′ x 6′ table, with a beleaguered British compound at one end, and a town in the middle. A British relief column had to fight

The Umbongo River, 1892

Darkest Africa, In the Heart of Africa, 28mm Next came a “Darkest Africa” colonial game, using Chris Peers’ Heart of Africa rules. It pitted my German East Africa Company (an expanded version of my WW1 East German Schutztruppe) against the He He (played by Adrian Rennie). This was the first outing for both forcers, although

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