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Die Kriegskunst

The Defence of Königswinter, 1757

The Seven Years War, Die Kriegskunst, 28mm Having tinkered extensively with the draft set of Die Kreigskunst 2 (DKK2) we thought it was time to try out the rules again. So, in this battle, my Reichsarmee were pitted against the forces of Hesse-Kassel. The game was very loosely based on a Charles Grant scenario – “The

The Battle of Die Wildnis, 1759

The Seven Years War, Die Kriegskunst v2, 28mm This week we were off to High Germany, for our first proper playtest of Die Kriegskunst 2, or Son of Kriegskunst, or whatever we’re going to call it. Essentially the rules are a modified version of Dave Brown’s General d’Armee, with a lot of the original Die Kriegskunst thrown into the

The Wagon Train, 1760

Seven Years War, Die Kriegskunst, 28mm This old Charles S. Grant scenario always produces a good game, however we play it. The thing is, we haven’t run one for a couple of years, so Dougie and I decided to give it a go this week. The premise is, a wagon train full of plunder has

Leipowitz, Saxony, 1757

The Seven Years War, Die Kriegskunst, 28mm This was another “teaser” from Scenarios for Wargames – a real classic. The wagon train scenario has been refought many times, and pictures of one of my games (using the very same wagons) was published in Charles S’ Grant’s Wargamers’ Companion. Anyway, in this little game we decided

The Bridge over the Ems, 1759

The Seven Years War, Die Kriegskunst, 28mm This small game scenario centred around a broken wheel. The wheel of a Prussian ammunition wagon had broken while the wagon was crossing a bridge over the River Ems near Münster, in Western Germany. The accident happened as a siege battery was being moved across country, and the blocked

Frankenberg, 1758

The Seven Years War, Die Kriegskunst variant, 28mm Rather than using our regular rules Die Kriegskunst as written, this little game was played out on a 6×4 foot table using a some variants Dougie is developing. They haven’t really got much further than the “rules on a postcard” stage, but Cry Havoc and Let Slip the

Landsberg an den Warthe, 1758

The Seven Years War, Die Kriegskunst, 28mm This small Seven Years War game was fought around Landsberg an den Warthe, the village on the banks of the River Warthe on the Prussian-Polish border. It was held by a regiment of Prussian Freikorps, backed up by jaegers and artillery, while a stronger Prussian force was a

Littau, 1758

The Seven Years War, Die Kriegskunst, 28mm AS I was coming in late from the London plane, I was little more than an observer in this Seven Years War game. It was fought out between Dougie and “Dax” on a small 6×4 table game to give Dax an idea of the rules. Dax supplied the

Crossing the Saale, 1757

The Seven Years War, Die Kriegskunst, 28mm This week we played out the “Bridgehead Breakout” scenario from Charles S. Grant’s Scenarios for Wargamers (1981). Like most of Charles’ scenarios, winning the game is harder than it looks. The Prussians (behind line G-H) were trying to break out of their bridgehead over the River Saale, although

The Bridge at Beeskow, 1760

The Seven Years War, Die Kriegskunst, 28mm The premise behind this little game was that a Russian raiding force had crossed the Elbe, and burned down a gun foundry on the outskirts of Berlin. It was now trying to get back to the Elbe and safety. This was loosely based on Totleben’s Berlin Raid of

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