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The Italian Wars

The Battle of Cernigola, 1503

The Italian Wars, Pike & Shotte, 28mm Michael Schneider is our club’s true Renaissance man. Rather, he’s the one with most of the lead, and keep staging games. Donald has quite a few figures too, and recently I’ve got in on the act by starting a small Venetian army. Anyway, Michael organised this game, which

The Battle of Garigliano, 1503

The Italian Wars, Pike & Shotte, 28mm These days, when we don’t know what else to play at the club, my German friend Michael Schneider suggests a Renaissance game. We’ve played a few of these now, and they always look good, despite Michael’s minimalist approach to scenery. He likes battlefields stripped of ancillary detail –

The Battle of Pavia, 1525

The Italian Wars, Pike & Shotte, 28mm We called this game Pavia because it was loosely based on the Battle of Pavia, but really it should be Pavia Light, as  only the general proportions of troops and dispositions were the same as in the real battle. This game had no walled city, no French siegeworks

The Battle of Fornovo, 1495

The Italian Wars, Pike & Shotte,  28mm I’ve always been rather fond of the Italian Wars – in fact it was the subject of one of my earliest Osprey books – Pavia 1525, published way back in 1996. It’s still one of my favourite Ospreys, largely because it redefined what happened during the battle –

The Battle of Soltau, 1519

The Italian Wars, Pike & Shotte, 28mm Yes, I know this isn’t really an Italian Wars game as the battle was fought over the mountains in Southern Germany, but the time period is right, so it’s getting lumped in with the goings on in Italy. I can’t say I’d heard of the Battle of Soltau until

San Miniato, 1495

The Italian Wars, Impetus, 28mm First of all, I have to apologise for the ugly bases. Despite the nice-looking figures this was one of the ugliest games I’ve played in! This game was all about trying out a new set of rules, and sensibly enough the owner of the lead didn’t want to rebase his

The Italian Wars – Playing the Period

I really love this period. One of the first Osprey books I ever wrote was Pavia 1525. I studied Italian Renaissance history at university, and my Masters dissertation was about Renaissance artillery -albeit guns used at sea. However, my actual foray into the wargaming of the Italian Wars was recent. Like so many projects, it

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